Art, Event, exhibition, Joy C Martindale, painting

Group Show at Nunnery Gallery

Save The Date!

Coming very soon: I will be showing new work in a group show at Nunnery Gallery 🦜

In Response 

31/08/2021 – 05/09/2021

Nunnery Gallery
181 Bow Road, London, E3 2SJ

Private View: Thursday 2nd September 6-9pm

🦜In Response is the first group show of new paintings by 29 London artists from the 2020/21 Turps Correspondence Course.🦜

See gallery website for exhibition opening times http://www.bowarts.org

@bowarts

#contemporaryart#contemporarypainting#contemporarybritishpainting
#newwork#londonartshow#paintingshow#arte#galerie#gallery#artcollector#artintheUK#londonart#freeentrylondon#firstthursday#newexhibition#paintingtoday#Nunnery

Standard
Art, Environment, nature, New Work, painting

The Song of The Earth

I have been listening to Der Abschied, the closing part of The Song of The Earth by Gustav Mahler. The songs in Song of The Earth, a composition for two voices and an orchestra, are based on several poems written by poets of the Tang dynasty.

This particular version was conducted in 1952 by his friend Bruno Walter. It is a moving piece made all the more powerful once you learn that Mahler didn’t live to hear the work performed.

Kathleen Ferrier’s contralto voice is incredible and sadly she was gravely ill with cancer when she performed it for this recording. She died the following year aged just 41.

Tragic, beautiful and addictive listening!

The Song of The Earth (July 5th 2021), oil pastel and chalk on paper by Joy C Martindale

This piece continues my project responding to recordings of The Song of the Earth.  For this work I listened to a version conducted by Long Yu which pairs Mahler’s symphonic song-cycle with contemporary compositions by Xiaogang Ye that draw on the texts in the original Mandarin.

The title ‘Everywhere the Lovely Earth Blossoms Forth’ is a line from Mahler’s version of The Song of the Earth. The songs talk of the beauty of the earth but the words today take on a new troubling poignancy as our awareness grows of the destruction the human race  has unleashed on the natural world. 

Man-made climate change threatens us all with developing countries and the poor currently facing the greatest threat. How can we work together to create a fairer and more sustainable future? Art can provide new and unexpected routes into reflective dialogue that brings the heart and soul into engagement with tackling climate change issues. 

“There’s a guy I worked with in Canada who once told me important issues first go into your head and that’s interesting and fascinating. Then they go into your heart and that’s exciting, then into your gut, which is really worrying, and then into your soul.

“When it goes into your soul, you can’t get it out, no matter how much you try, and you have to do something about it.

“I think that’s what happened to me with climate change. First of all, I found it fascinating, then it was all very exciting to try and understand and see where it was happening, then it was really troubling. Now it’s in my soul and that’s what gets me out of bed every day.”

Dr Gabrielle Walker 

https://thewaterline.global/news/climate-change-is-in-my-head-heart-and-soul-we-have-to-do-a-whole-lot-more/

Standard
Art, exhibition, Joy C Martindale

SAVAGE Postcard Exhibition

SAVAGE Journal have released their SAVAGE postcard exhibition! Posted is a set of 15 postcards featuring the work of UCL artists, spanning photography, painting, collage, sculpture, drawing and performance.

☀️Included in the set is my painting Sing To Me.☀️

The postcards are available to buy from the UCL Student Union shop, with half of proceeds donated to Mind.

Standard
Art, Article, Joy C Martindale, New Work, painting

Sensation In Print

What helped you get through the most recent lockdown?

I turned to music and had the radio on for most of the day, every day! I found music provided a much needed form of escapism.

In my current practice I am exploring the act of making art as a liberating gesture.  The various positive sensations of pleasure, calm, elation and catharsis that listening to music gives me, as I paint and draw in my studio, collide and combine with all the other sensations I am experiencing at that moment and are translated directly into my painting. From music – to my body and mind’s response – to the painting, to the viewer experiencing the work, is a chain of sensations. These chains of sensations connect us to each other and help us make sense of our realities, as Haruki Murakami explains so eloquently here:

“Because memory and sensations are so uncertain, so biased, we always rely on a certain reality-call it an alternate reality-to prove the reality of events. To what extent facts we recognize as such really are as they seem, and to what extent these are facts merely because we label them as such, is an impossible distinction to draw. Therefore, in order to pin down reality as reality, we need another reality to relativize the first. Yet that other reality requires a third reality to serve as its grounding. An endless chain is created within our consciousness, and it is the very maintenance of this chain that produces the sensation that we are actually here, that we ourselves exist.”

Haruki Murakami, South of the Border, West of the Sun

You can see a painting I made about this on the cover of the latest issue of Savage Journal, Issue #13 Sensation. Savage Journal is UCL’s Arts and Culture Journal – Read it online or pick up a copy for free from the UCL campus.

Cover Art: Sing To Me I (January 2021) by Joy C Martindale, oil pencil, watercolour, acrylic and gouache on gesso on wood panel, 30.5cm x 41 x 2.2cm
Sing To Me II (January 2021) by Joy C Martindale, oil pencil, watercolour, acrylic and gouache on gesso on wood panel, 30.5cm x 41 x 2.2cm
Standard
Art, Article, Discussion, Joy C Martindale, Mental Health, New Work, painting

Happy International Day of Happiness to Everyone

Slightly Happier (Dec 2020), gouache and acrylic on paper, by Joy C Martindale, 41 x 31cm

When was the last time you felt happy?

My children have just discovered The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air and I felt happy when I laughed myself into hysterics at a funny scene. Does that count?

I felt happy yesterday when I was on a train reading a magazine. I was reading that visitors to the artist Lala Rukh’s house were greeted by ‘two unmistakable seasonal smells: in winter, log-fire smoke and in summer, jasmine and lime wafting in from the garden.’* One sentence was enough to transport me there. The feeling of happiness that came with it was strong but momentary, does that count? In this strange and unsettling time, which has impacted on every aspect of our lives, I think it has to.

I think it is possible to equate positive emotional experiences – those little, everyday mood boosting moments that bring us joy – to happiness. Before the pandemic, perhaps happiness was something that shined with promise on the horizon; a state of being that could be obtained if we worked hard enough for it, but now when the future has become an unknown quantity and our focus has been pulled up short, it is our day-to-day experiences that we feel most acutely attuned to. With this has come a greater awareness of our moods and the fleetingness of them. Think of all the moods you can be in all in one day – an anxious mood, a sad mood, an angry mood, a calm mood, a dreamy mood and so on. Something positive that can come out of this imposed day-to-day existence could be the realisation that if we can let go of the pursuit of happiness as a panacea, we may become more open to acknowledging those nuggets of happiness we are already experiencing in our everyday lives.

So, even when we might feel sad, lonely, anxious or unhappy as we have probably all felt at some point during the pandemic, it is possible to experience happiness as part of these emotional experiences too.

More reading: Dr Daisy Fancourt and Research Fellow Alex Bradbury (UCL Epidemiology & Health) have tracked the everyday experiences of 70,000 people asking them each week how they are feeling.  

https://www.ucl.ac.uk/news/2021/feb/analysis-we-asked-70000-people-how-coronavirus-affected-them

*Quote taken from Lives of the Artists: Lala Rukh By Mariah Lookman. Tate Etc Issue 48, P108

Scott Mills ‘This is Scott Mills on R1. How much do you love this?’ (talking about Jerusalem (Remix) by Master KG) 

Chris Stark: ‘Oh mate, every time this comes on, I feel slightly happier. And that’s a good thing.”

Scott Mills: ‘That’s kind of important right now.’ (04/11/2020)

Standard
Art, Joy C Martindale, New Work, painting, Personal histories

Sing To Me (2021)

Sing To Me II (2021)
Sing To Me I (2021)

In my current practice I am exploring the act of making art as a liberating gesture. The title ‘Sing To Me‘ refers to the essential escapism music has provided me during the Covid-19 lockdowns. The various positive sensations of pleasure, calm, elation and catharsis listening to music gives me, as I paint and draw in my studio collide and combine with all the other sensations I am experiencing at that moment and are translated directly into my painting. From music – to my body and mind’s response – to the painting, to the viewer experiencing the work, is a chain of sensations. These chains of sensations connect us to each other and help us make sense of our realities, as Haruki Murakami explains so eloquently here:

“Because memory and sensations are so uncertain, so biased, we always rely on a certain reality-call it an alternate reality-to prove the reality of events. To what extent facts we recognize as such really are as they seem, and to what extent these are facts merely because we label them as such, is an impossible distinction to draw. Therefore, in order to pin down reality as reality, we need another reality to relativize the first. Yet that other reality requires a third reality to serve as its grounding. An endless chain is created within our consciousness, and it is the very maintenance of this chain that produces the sensation that we are actually here, that we ourselves exist.”Haruki Murakami, South of the Border, West of the Sun

Standard
Art, Community, Event, exhibition, fabric, Joy C Martindale, New Work

Trailblazers

Trailblazers-eflyer

Trailblazers

Exhibition Announcement! Visit Walmer Castle in Kent to see my show Trailblazers.

Trailblazers is a new participatory artwork – the exciting outcome of my project working with young people who are supported by Kent Refugee Action Network (KRAN).

Trailblazers

29th February – 19th April 2020

Walmer Castle

Kingsdown Road, Walmer, Deal, Kent, CT14 7LJ

This project has been funded by a National Lottery Arts Council Project grant and National Lottery Heritage Funding, and forms part of English Heritage’s Re-Discovering Walmer’s Lost Pleasure Grounds project.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Standard
Art, Event, exhibition, Joy C Martindale

SAVAGE 2020 Exhibition

Family (2017-19) by Joy C Martindale

I’m showing new work in the Savage 2020 exhibition. PV 21st January at St Pancras Crypt, 165 Euston Road, Bloomsbury, NW1 2BA 6-9pm.

🌟 ‘Showcasing 20 fantastic UCL artists, there’ll be performance, video screenings, installation, live music and a subsidised bar. Don’t miss it.’ Savage Journal🌟

Standard
Art, Award, charity, Community, Joy C Martindale

Funding Award Announcement

🌿I am delighted to announce I have been awarded National Lottery Arts Council Project Funding to run a new participatory community art project at Walmer Castle. This project is also supported by National Lottery Heritage funding and forms part of English Heritage’s wonderful Re-discovering Walmer’s Lost Pleasure Grounds Project.

Over the course of 6 workshops I will be working with young people supported by Kent Refugee Action Network (KRAN). The first workshop is on Thursday and I can’t wait to meet the participants.

More details coming soon!🌿

Standard